Hands Across the Sea - Ann Castle, 1811 - Soie 1003 Thread Kit

Regular price $72.00 Save $-72.00
1 in stock

Ann Castle is a delightful, cute sampler from Hands Across the Sea. The design is suitable for intermediate and advanced needleworkers but is not beyond a determined beginner. 

Kit Options

Choice of purchasing thread only OR as full kit.

Full Kit options:

Includes linen of choice + 20 spools of Soie 1003 thread, Printed Chart and 2 Tapestry Size 10 Beading Needles (Gift with Purchase)

Linen Choices:

20 spool of Au Ver a Soie®, Soie 100/3 Kit Includes: 

  • SMS 031 - Old gold ~ medium
  • SMS 072 - Grey green ~ medium
  • SMS 129 - Mocha brown ~ dark
  • SMS 135 - Terracotta ~ light
  • SMS 148 - Yellow Beige ~ medium
  • SMS 197 - Brown grey ~ medium
  • SMS 211 - Tan – ultra very light
  • SMS 217 - Mahogany ~ ultra very light
  • SMS 378 - Green grey ~ dark
  • SMS 492 - Old gold ~ very dark
  • SMS 517 - Hazelnut brown ~ dark
  • SMS 550 - Blue green ~ dark
  • SMS 562 - Yellow Beige ~ light
  • SMS 603 - Beige grey ~ dark
  • SMS 616 - Golden olive ~ dark
  • SMS 621 - Blue green ~ light
  • SMS 644 - Salmon ~ very dark
  • SMS 712 - Grey green ~ light
  • SMS 718 - Green grey
  • SMS 756 - Blue green ~ very dark

***Please note, this item is excluded from any discounts or sales.

About the Sampler from Nicola Parkman:

“A 19th century needlework Sampler by Ann Castle, dated 1811, 45cm x 32cm, (the owners grandparents believe the image of the house in the sampler is that of Holly Cottage, 18 High Street, Wargrave, Berkshire. Ann Castle lived in the cottage which formed part of the estate of the local manor house, the (owners) grandparents lived in the house as both were in service at the local manor house, one as a chauffeur and the other as a housemaid. They continued to live at Holly Cottage after their retirement and it is possible that the sampler was in Holly Cottage while they lived there and was subsequently gifted to them at some point. While the sampler shows three upstairs windows you can see from the photo with the sampler that the middle window was bricked up during the Georgian period to avoid the window tax”.